University of the Sunshine Coast

Thank you for making a difference!
The University of the Sunshine Coast (USC) would like to take this opportunity to thank you for being involved in Run Sunshine Coast and wish you all the best for Sunday! Remember it’s not about the final result – you’re making a difference to the lives of children in our community.
USC is delighted to be involved in the inaugural Run Sunshine Coast, supporting a fantastic local cause. The work that Wishlist does to improve Child Development Services on the Sunshine Coast is invaluable and we thank them for their ongoing hard work. USC is committed to supporting events that provide improved access to medical facilities and services for young people in our community.
Make sure you drop by the USC marquee on Sunday to say hi, have your blood pressure checked and receive a free reflective wristband. We’re really looking forward to the event and seeing everyone there! Good luck.

Thank you for making a difference!

The University of the Sunshine Coast (USC) would like to take this opportunity to thank you for being involved in Run Sunshine Coast and wish you all the best for Sunday! Remember it’s not about the final result – you’re making a difference to the lives of children in our community.

USC is delighted to be involved in the inaugural Run Sunshine Coast, supporting a fantastic local cause. The work that Wishlist does to improve Child Development Services on the Sunshine Coast is invaluable and we thank them for their ongoing hard work. USC is committed to supporting events that provide improved access to medical facilities and services for young people in our community.

Make sure you drop by the USC marquee on Sunday to say hi, have your blood pressure checked and receive a free reflective wristband. We’re really looking forward to the event and seeing everyone there! Good luck.


An amazing video by Brian Dale – a USC International student who began studying a Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Business (Design and Marketing) in 2010. Brian is just about to graduate from USC and has created a time lapse as part of his final university project. His video captures the scenic beauty of the Sunshine Coast and what it has to offer.

Thank you Brian for sharing this special project with us and good luck with your next adventure!

The USC team is ready for #runsunshinecoast next Sunday 29 June! #unisunshinecoast #runaustralia

The USC team is ready for #runsunshinecoast next Sunday 29 June! #unisunshinecoast #runaustralia


Tip # 4 for Run Sunshine Coast: The science of your shoes

Arguably, one of the most important pieces of equipment for runners is their shoes. Running shoe manufacturers invest enormous resources into improving shoe technology with several training shoes now incorporating advanced “smart” materials and micro-processors that can mould to your feet, keep a training log, and alter shock absorption levels.

Running with light shoes requires less energy than running with heavy ones. It is worth noting that some shoes on the market are very heavy so it is always worth shopping around. Remember that a 200 gram increase in shoe weight is not much if you weigh 90kg, but can represent a significant increase in load for a 45kg runner.

The foot and not the shoe, does the majority of the work in shock absorption and energy transfer. So always look after your feet and keep them supple and strong.

The key message here is to avoid changing shoes now in the lead up to the race. Please note that some runners experience pain when running, or have a history of overuse injuries as a result of abnormalities in their running gait and/or foot mechanics. These individuals are sometimes prescribed certain shoes and/or use orthotic devices inside their shoes in an attempt to address these issues. If this is you, consult your practitioner.

If you’d like more information about studying at the University of the Sunshine Coast, visit www.usc.edu.au

#runsunshinecoast


Tip # 3 for Run Sunshine Coast: Running technique - heel versus mid-foot striking

There is a large body of scientific and coaching literature on the biomechanics of running technique. Search for this topic on Google™ and you will be flooded with ideas, tips, new concepts and training drills. An area of considerable debate over the last 5 or so years concerns whether it is more efficient to run with a heel or mid-foot strike.

Some individuals will start to mid-foot strike the instant they transition from walking to running, while others will heel strike even at quite high running velocities. Regardless, heel strike running is common, with research suggesting that 75-90% of all distance runners heel strike.

So what does this mean for you leading up to the race? First, research is inconclusive as to whether mid-foot striking is better than heel striking (and visa-versa), so don’t get hung up on trying to change for performance reasons. Your body is attuned to how you run so it would be a big mistake to attempt to change it in the months leading up to the race. Indeed, changing your technique now would likely result in reduced performance and possibly injury. Even more importantly, running efficiency is determined by more than just what part of your foot hits the ground first so focus on running smoothly and avoid technique trends.

If you’d like more information about studying at the University of the Sunshine Coast, visit www.usc.edu.au

#runsunshinecoast


Tip # 2 for Run Sunshine Coast: Playing the volume versus intensity game

If you race for time, then follow a simple rule – to get faster, you have to train faster!

While a certain amount of volume is important in distance running, the adaptations that occur with increased running intensity are vital if you want to set new PB’s or challenge your rivals. Essentially, the body adapts to the loads it experiences.

There are numerous methods for doing this ranging from Fartlek training (short sprints contained within a longer distance session) to the various forms of interval training (repetitions of higher intensity running interspersed with controlled rest periods). Clearly, you can’t train at high intensity all the time and so aim for one or two higher intensity sessions per week. When running at these higher intensities, concentrate on trying to relax and don’t fight it!

The key message here is to establish what you want from the race, and then train accordingly. Always listen to your body and back off training if you are not well or excessively tired.

If you’d like more information about the University of the Sunshine Coast, visit www.usc.edu.au

#runsunshinecoast


Tip # 1 for Run Sunshine Coast: Running for fun

If you race “for the fun of it” then it is important to accustom your body to the duration of the event prior to competing.

This volume based approach is based on allowing your body time to adapt to the loadings associated with longer distances. When “cruising” concentrate on a fluid running stride and keep your head and chest up (don’t slouch) and practice setting little goals for yourself.

The main thing here is to increase training volume carefully as sudden increases in training volume can lead to overuse style injuries. #runsunshinecoast


New Semester Fiesta. University of the Sunshine Coast. Let the party begin! #usc

New Semester Fiesta. University of the Sunshine Coast. Let the party begin! #usc


uscinternational:

I have had a desire to learn Spanish ever since I first came to Spain when I was 10. I thought I was pretty good at the language, but arriving here sure proved me wrong! I felt discouraged for the first few weeks, but soon decided to accept it as a challenge, not a defeat. I am now taking 5 Spanish classes per week, have a group of Spanish speaking friends, attend Flamenco, Salsa and Bachetta classes and play soccer with Spaniards and Spanish teachers, and go to a Spanish church. I still have a lot of trouble understanding everything, but if i ask people to speak more slowly it isn’t too bad, and with all that practice I am improving pretty fast!But Language is just a tiny part of the Spanish experience. The lifestyle is totally different to home, and although i love it, it took a little while to get used to. Lunch isn’t until 2:30, then siesta is from 3:00 til 5:30, dinner is at 10:00 and an early night is 12:00 or 1:00! And I have heard that it is even later in summer, as the sun doesn’t set till about 10:30. This pattern was very confusing for the first few weeks, because when i say that siesta is from 3:00-5:30. that means that everyone takes a nap, even the shop keepers. So all the shops close for the afternoon then open up for the night. It doesn’t take too long to get into the swing of things though.I mentioned that I am doing flamenco, salsa and bachetta lessons. Dancing is a big part of the Spanish life. Flamenco is not as popular, being more traditional and exclusive, but it is challenging and a lot of fun! Salsa is the main dance of Spain. It is what is danced in all the clubs. Night clubs are very different here too. They don’t come with the same connotations as at home, they are simply a place to dance with friends. sure people drink and hook up at nightclubs, but that is not the primary reason that you go clubbing. It is to dance! Sport is not popular for girls, but I enjoy training with the soccer team at the uni twice per week.The city of Sevilla, where I am living, is one of the most beautiful cities I have seen, and I have seen quite a few! There are so many old buildings, churches and tiny, cobbled streets with tapas bars and miniature pot-plant-filled balconies. It amazes me constantly that the buildings here are many times older than our country! Many of the buildings are from B.C.! Almost every street that I walk down has something that I want to take a photo of.
I could not have chosen a better country than Spain, or a better town than Sevilla to study in, and I don’t regret it at all. I am looking forward to making more Spanish friends, improving my language skills and living it up in general!
un saludo, y hasta la próxima vez!
Rosie

uscinternational:

I have had a desire to learn Spanish ever since I first came to Spain when I was 10. I thought I was pretty good at the language, but arriving here sure proved me wrong! I felt discouraged for the first few weeks, but soon decided to accept it as a challenge, not a defeat. I am now taking 5 Spanish classes per week, have a group of Spanish speaking friends, attend Flamenco, Salsa and Bachetta classes and play soccer with Spaniards and Spanish teachers, and go to a Spanish church. I still have a lot of trouble understanding everything, but if i ask people to speak more slowly it isn’t too bad, and with all that practice I am improving pretty fast!

But Language is just a tiny part of the Spanish experience. The lifestyle is totally different to home, and although i love it, it took a little while to get used to. Lunch isn’t until 2:30, then siesta is from 3:00 til 5:30, dinner is at 10:00 and an early night is 12:00 or 1:00! And I have heard that it is even later in summer, as the sun doesn’t set till about 10:30. This pattern was very confusing for the first few weeks, because when i say that siesta is from 3:00-5:30. that means that everyone takes a nap, even the shop keepers. So all the shops close for the afternoon then open up for the night. It doesn’t take too long to get into the swing of things though.

I mentioned that I am doing flamenco, salsa and bachetta lessons. Dancing is a big part of the Spanish life. Flamenco is not as popular, being more traditional and exclusive, but it is challenging and a lot of fun! Salsa is the main dance of Spain. It is what is danced in all the clubs. Night clubs are very different here too. They don’t come with the same connotations as at home, they are simply a place to dance with friends. sure people drink and hook up at nightclubs, but that is not the primary reason that you go clubbing. It is to dance! Sport is not popular for girls, but I enjoy training with the soccer team at the uni twice per week.

The city of Sevilla, where I am living, is one of the most beautiful cities I have seen, and I have seen quite a few! There are so many old buildings, churches and tiny, cobbled streets with tapas bars and miniature pot-plant-filled balconies. It amazes me constantly that the buildings here are many times older than our country! Many of the buildings are from B.C.! Almost every street that I walk down has something that I want to take a photo of.

I could not have chosen a better country than Spain, or a better town than Sevilla to study in, and I don’t regret it at all. I am looking forward to making more Spanish friends, improving my language skills and living it up in general!

un saludo, y hasta la próxima vez!

Rosie


uscinternational:

USC student Melissa, is currently studying on an exchange semester at one of USC’s partner universities in Mexico – Tec De Monterrey- Queretaro.
This blog and her amazing photos, show the beauty of the people, landscape and architecture in Mexico and are a record of her travels through the region… take a look!
http://melissa-ajourney.blogspot.com/

uscinternational:

USC student Melissa, is currently studying on an exchange semester at one of USC’s partner universities in Mexico – Tec De Monterrey- Queretaro.

This blog and her amazing photos, show the beauty of the people, landscape and architecture in Mexico and are a record of her travels through the region… take a look!

http://melissa-ajourney.blogspot.com/